Permission to be great: increasing engagement in your school

After coaching hundreds of school leaders from around the world, I’ve noticed a trend: that school leaders are both their own biggest enemy as well as their own biggest opportunity. Permission to be Great shows you how to get out of your own way and focus on the latter. Taking action on Butler’s ideas is your path toward sustainable greatness.

Daniel Bauer | Host of the Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast
with over one million downloads

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Jim Knight,
Senior Partner of the Instructional Coaching Group

Dan shows us how to find balance, efficacy, positive energy, and authentic power.

Permission to be Great is a must-read book for anyone who wants to make a difference and live a good and beautiful life.

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Jessica Cabeen, National Distinguished Principal, Author, and Speaker

Dan has eloquently woven stories from educators in the field, along with his own vulnerable mistakes and setbacks, to write a book that
will become a go-to resource for readers.

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Joe Sanfelippo, Superintendent of Fall Creek Schools (WI)

Permission to be Great provides leaders with the opportunity to be just
that...great. The stories will engage you; the process will force you to reflect; and the practical application of the models will yield immediate

results.

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Tim Kight,
Founder/CEO Focus 3

This is a must-read book for educators. Dan Butler addresses the real-world challenges in today's educational environment.

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Dana Schon, Professional Development Director, School Administrators of Iowa

Dan blends appealing narratives with actionable information grounded in a solid research base to support leaders in creating high-energy, engaging learning cultures.

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Peter Dewitt, School Leadership Coach, Author, Facilitator

In Permission to be Great, Dan Butler offers readers compelling stories, actionable steps, and models what great school communities can do to increase engagement.

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